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This is where we talk about all things music. Here you’ll find our Music Genre Guides, which come in a variety of sizes, shown just under the blog summary. The 10-minute plus reads dive into the detail. The microblogs — shown as 1-minute reads — give you a brief heads up. And you can search for any genre or title, too.
Taking a detour from the more modern popular trends in music, today we are going to be briefly introducing some historically underrepresented musical traditions from around the world. These traditions span thousands of years and have much to offer beyond the typical stereotypes such as the use of a sitar signifying Indian music. In this brief starter to global music traditions, we shall give an overview of common sonic features and instruments. Japanese Music Japanese
10 min plus read, Blog
Returning to popular musical genres, today we shall take a brief look at the history and bigger styles of country music. Emerging out of Western American tradition and gaining traction around the time of the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, country music has much to offer on its journey into the mainstream, with many big country artists now filling arenas around the world. Traditional Country and Western Country music originated in the 20th century
10 min plus read, Blog
20th Century [1900 – 2000] As the new century dawned , composers such as Gustav Mahler, Richard Strauss and Jean Sibelius were pushing the bounds of post-Romantic symphonic writing. On the other hand, the French ‘Impressionist’ school — a term hated by one of its leading proponents, Claude Debussy — was gaining traction in France. Along with Maurice Ravel, Paul Dukas and the Englishman Frederick Delius (who lived in France) Debussy spear-headed a style of
3 min read, Blog
Romantic [1820-1900] Composers of the Romantic period wanted greater emotional expression, so they upped their game with increasingly dense harmonies, moving towards chromaticism, which simply put, means greater use of notes that are not strictly in the key of the piece at any given time. The word comes from the Latin “chroma”, which simply means colour. Composers were adding more and more emotional colour by the increased use of non-key (chromatic) notes alongside those notes
3 min read, Blog
Baroque [1600 – 1750] This period is famous for some truly great composers such as Bach, Handel and Vivaldi as well as the introduction of standardised keys in a system known as equal temperament. Musical virtuosity really took off in this era, with pieces like Bach’s ‘Brandenburg Concertos’ featuring a group of soloists with a larger ensemble accompaniment. And did you know that Vivaldi’s ‘The Four Seasons’ is actually a series of violin concertos that
3 min read, Blog
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